Materiality & Method: A Small Works Fiber Show

Please join us on Sunday, September 8th from 4 - 6 pm for the opening reception of Materiality & Method a small works fiber show organized by Textile Arts Los Angeles in conjunction with Textile Month in September 2019. The exhibition will be on view at Daniella Carter’s architectural studio Pretty Smart in Long Beach, CA, through Saturday, October 5th, 2019.

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Fiber is a fluid medium that allows artists to approach their work in many ways. This exhibition focuses on the intersection of process and material, and how every artist addresses these ideas in their work. Featuring artists’ work that uses innovative methods that manipulate, re-imagine and transcend our understanding of material.

Renae is pleased to be showing a wall sculpture entitled “The Noise Got Too Loud” made with cheesecloth, sodium chloride, dead sea salts, cardboard, and resin alongside a group of featured textile artists: Peggy Weidemann, Carlyn Clark, Sandy Abrams, Eva Rabin, Susan Maddux, Michael Rohde, Gwen Samuels, Polly Giacchina, Penny Collins, Joanna Stott, Lydia Tjioe Hall, Elise Vazelakis, Anne M Bray, Tamara Tolkin, Anna Zinsmeister, Dellis Frank, Barbara Klare, Claudia Zhao, Jamia Weir, and Brittany Wittman McLaughlin.

The Noise Got Too Loud. 10”W x 9”L x 3.5”D. Cheesecloth, sodium chloride, dead sea salts, cardboard, resin (2019).

The Noise Got Too Loud. 10”W x 9”L x 3.5”D. Cheesecloth, sodium chloride, dead sea salts, cardboard, resin (2019).

For more information about Textile Arts Los Angeles please visit www.textileartsla.org

Open Studio Showcase Review

Open Studio Showcase Review

Fine artist Renae Barnard opened the doors to her private studio location in Los Angeles for an exclusive showcase Sunday, May 27th. Invitees were the first to preview recently completed works by the artist.

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Working through a variety of mediums, Barnard's studio is thoughtfully curated with paintings, sculptures, and installations. Her latest work includes paintings and sculptures made with salt. This mineral inclusion creates natural formations and crystalline surface qualities when combined with paint.

Throughout the event, Barnard generously shares insights into her artistic process and material explorations with guests.

Her multi-media works incorporate recycled materials from the furniture manufacturing industry to create sculptural foundations for painting. The organic formations and layered textures reference natural earthen elements and minerals. A gem-like color palette of low-VOC paints was specially provided by Dunn-Edwards in support of this eco-conscious project.

The artist displays her collection of gemstones; a personal vignette of inspiration for these new works.

"Many of my sculptures are worked within inches of collapse and reflect my attraction to the imperfect and aged" says Barnard. This is a recurring theme seen throughout the artist's body of work. Her latest sculptures also experiment with paint and salt, and are displayed in crumbling volcanic formations. The fractured surfaces reveal saturated colors and tectonic layering.

Illuminated installations by Renae Barnard add ambiance to the intimate studio space. Made from recycled plastic sheeting, the artist knots and drapes the materials into cloud-like sculptures. The lightweight material floats above guests heads with a soft glow.

The event was well attended by private collectors, local journalists and close colleagues of the artist. A quick walk-through of the studio showcase featured artworks at every turn. The diversity of media and artistic process reveal Barnard's pleasure of the hand-made.

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Mauveine State a paper sculpture on display by the artist was meticulously dip dyed by hand to reveal the delicacy of each layer. Barnard often pushes the limits of materials in her own works to reveal their delicacy and transience. Her intrinsic approach delights in the tactility and decadence of making in a way that viewer's are immediately drawn to.

Barnard has a Master of Fine Arts degree from Claremont Graduate University and is a recipient of the Sue Arlen Walker and Harvey M. Parker Memorial Fellowship, the Armory Center for the Arts Teaching Artist Fellowship, the Ahmanson Annual Fellowship, the Lincoln Fellowship Award and the Christopher Street West Art & Culture Grant.

Barnard has created site specific, socially engaged works and exhibited at local and international galleries/film festivals including Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, Rutgers University, Towson University, Drake University, Harriet & Charles Luckman Gallery, SOMArts Gallery, Pete & Susan Barrett Gallery, LGBT Film Festival Boston, Long Beach LGBTQ Film Festival, Tampa International LGBTQ Film Festival, and the Bergamot Station Arts Center in Santa Monica among others. To learn more about Renae Barnard, please visit:

www.renaebarnard.com

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PRNewswire: Renae Barnard Open Studio - May 27th, 2018

LOS ANGELES, May 22, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Fine artist Renae Barnard opens the doors to her private studio location in Los Angeles for an exclusive showcase Sunday, May 27th from 12 - 3pm. Invitees will be the first to preview recently completed works by the artist.

Mauveine State. 13”W x 26”L x 4”D. Paper, Dye.

Mauveine State. 13”W x 26”L x 4”D. Paper, Dye.

Recently featured by The Woven Tale Press, Selvedge Magazine and Art Blitz Los Angeles, Renae Barnard's studio practice includes sculpture, painting and textile artworks. Her latest works incorporate recycled materials from the furniture manufacturing industry to create sculptural foundations for painting. The organic formations and layered textures reference natural earthen elements and minerals. A gem-like color palette of low-VOC paints was specially provided by Dunn-Edwards in support of this eco-conscious project.

Renae Barnard, Untitled 2018.

Renae Barnard, Untitled 2018.

Indulging in the pleasure and tactility of making, these folded, twisted, and sewn objects are both destroyed by and reinforced with the repetitive gestures by which they are made. "Many of my sculptures are worked within inches of collapse and reflect my attraction to the imperfect and the aged," says Barnard. The time consuming and ritualistic processes of braiding, weaving, stitching and hand-dying textiles highlights the delicacy and transience of the material. 'Why are attributes like softness and delicacy deemed "feminine"? And why are such qualities considered indicators of weakness?' These are just a few of the questions surrounding Barnard's artwork.

Creating a material language to explore these nuanced precepts, Barnard combines her hand-made craft technique with elements of playful divergence and social commentary. "I allow myself the sensitivity to make work that reveals both wounds and strengths, wrangling material out of an emotional response to feelings of tension. And so, my reason for making art is so that they might speak in my place, referencing issues that are uncomfortable and difficult to express in words."

Barnard has a Master of Fine Arts degree from Claremont Graduate University and is a recipient of the Sue Arlen Walker and Harvey M. Parker Memorial Fellowship, the Armory Center for the Arts Teaching Artist Fellowship, the Ahmanson Annual Fellowship, the Lincoln Fellowship Award and the Christopher Street West Art & Culture Grant.

Barnard has created site specific, socially engaged works and exhibited at local and international galleries/film festivals including Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, Rutgers University, Towson University, Drake University, Harriet & Charles Luckman Gallery, SOMArts Gallery, Pete & Susan Barrett Gallery, LGBT Film Festival Boston, Long Beach LGBTQ Film Festival, Tampa International LGBTQ Film Festival, and the Bergamot Station Arts Center in Santa Monica among others. To learn more about Renae Barnard, please visit: www.renaebarnard.com

WTP Central Studio Tour: Renae Barnard


Studio Tour: Renae Barnard


The Studio Tour series offers an inside peek into the work environments of WTP artists, as well as insight into their creative process within these resonate spaces.
By Jennifer Nelson, WTP Feature Writer
Renae Barnard is recognized by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) as a Leadership in Energy Accredited Professional (LEED AP) and by the International Institute for Bau-biologie® & Ecology as a Building Biologie Practitioner. She has recently completed projects in cooperation with the National Immigration Law Center and the City of Santa Monica Department of Cultural Affairs. She is a recipient of the Sue Arlen Walker and Harvey M. Parker Memorial Fellowship, the Armory Center for the Arts Teaching Artist Fellowship, The Ahmanson Annual Fellowship, Lincoln Fellowship Award, and Christopher Street West Art and Culture Grant.
For Renae Barnard, her studio is on the go. She weaves in her lap; bowls of salt mixture are evaporating on her front porch; she may rent out temporary spaces around Los Angeles as her projects require. For her most recent public work, at Bergamot Station, Santa Monica, California, she shared space with other artists in a large commercial building in Boyle Heights. “Sharing space with other artists on a short-term basis allows me the access to equipment I may need,” she says, “like a spray room, wood shop, or kiln without the financial burden of permanent overhead.”
Nevertheless, she faces challenges when sharing space, the main one in Los Angeles, not having a parking space. This meant that Barnard had to haul sculpture materials down a sidewalk to a metered parking space. “It’s not always the most convenient, but it’s manageable,” she says.
For two years, her studio was a tiny white box in Claremont, a city thirty miles east of Los Angeles, where she kept weaving and sewing materials, as well as tripods for her photography. Many of the materials were incorporated into works such as “Displaced Tinder,” a sculpture of twisted medical exam paper wound around school chairs.


With time, she has realized form through repetitive movements like weaving, sewing, and twisting motions. Now she is experimenting with other modes of accumulating form, including a series of fiber sculptures of cotton batting, upholstery foam, and polyester fiberfill scraps discarded by furniture manufacturers. These materials are supplemented with water-based paints by Dunn Edwards, salt, water-based glues, and vinegar. “I’m interested in the ways in which basic chemistry might create form beyond those achievable with my hands,” says Barnard.

To work, Barnard requires silence and solitude. She doesn’t want music, visitors, or lingering clutter. Her process is generally exploratory, allowing room for discovery along the path and at the finish. There’s an undercurrent of chaos that she’s always wrestling with. The outcome is not a literal display of the problem, nor is it offering a solution. It is a record of the thought process and the struggle: “I’m interested in examining our situations and hopefully moving beyond the place where we stand now.”



See Renae Barnard’s work in Vol. VI #4
Copyright 2018 Woven Tale Press LLC. All Rights Reserved.

"Renae Barnard: Promises of Progress" ArtBlitz Los Angeles





Socially conscious Los Angeles artist, Renae Barnard opens up with me for an interview regarding her most recent public installation at Bergamot station. Her installation brings us in visually with its tactile presence and keeps us intellectually with her powerful conceptual engagement with social justice and women’s rights issues.
 

Tell me a little about your background leading up to Claremont Graduate University and living and working in Los Angeles, how do you feel like these decisions helped shape your career?
I studied studio art at California State University Los Angeles and focused on mixed-media installation with elements of photography, ceramic sculpture and video. I was chosen from a select group of students to exhibit my installation, Almost Lovers Always Do during a special exhibition, Infinite Encores at the Harriet and Charles Luckman Gallery in Los Angeles, CA (2012).
 It was during my last year at CSULA that I began working on my first socially engaged project, How Do You Know? 
“What is a woman?” “What is a man?” “How do you know if you are one?” Despite how simple these questions may seem, they are often difficult and complicated to answer. It is the broad range of responses that emphasizes this. This work invites viewers to consider the social and psychological dynamics that charge the simplest of questions. Visitors have the opportunity to contribute their own responses both during the exhibition and afterwards by email or postal mail. The installation is ultimately fueled, created, and received by the community at large—not just those who attend, but also those who responded to the prompts initially, and those who provide additional responses after viewing the project.
Since its inception How Do You Know? has been installed at the San Francisco Center and the West Hollywood Public Library (as part of the Christopher Street West Pride Celebration), shown at the CSULA COMA Gallery and the LA Municipal Gallery, as well been installed inside of a U-Haul truck (as part of Install Weho) and in an East Los Angeles underground tunnel as part of This Magnificent World. The video documenting the installation was shown in 2013 as part of the Sick Exhibition in San Francisco and the Fargo-Moorhead Film Festival, and screened in 2014 at the Queens Museum, NY, the Women and Minority Film Festival, Tampa International LGBT Film Festival, Long Beach LGBTQ Film Festival, Park Circle Film Society Festival and the Boston LGBT Film Festival.
 Throughout my undergraduate studies, I had the opportunity to show my work at galleries and film festivals internationally. This gave me the opportunity to work with international curators and art professionals expanding my interest in social engagement and public practice.

Tell me about your artistic goals within your practice and how the materials you use have influenced this practice.
 I’m interested in indulging in the pleasure and tactility of making while exploring the network of interactions between perception, time and the inadequacy of language. Many of my sculptures are worked within inches of collapse and reflect my attraction to the imperfect and the aged. My work considers the ways in which identity is crafted and regulated by repetitive language and how realities are shaped through social ideologies. I am deeply invested in community-building, environmental issues, and social justice.

Tell me about this current piece at Bergamot Station and what your artistic vision was for installing it.
 Propagate Progress began as a participatory community-building event that culminated with a temporary sculptural installation. On May 21,2016 the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) trains opened to public passengers for the first time at 26th St/ Bergamot Station. Supported by a team of artists (friends) and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), I invited Bergamot Gallery visitors, train passengers and the public at large to discuss their visions for progress and to contribute their promises to the future by writing or drawing on large-scale paper rolls. What are the promises that we are willing to make to ourselves and each other? In what ways, small and large, can we contribute to a sustainable future?
By manually twisting together the shared community promises, a rope-like form was created and ultimately used as the primary building material of the sculpture. In the same way that our will to achieve progress strengthens when we come together, the frail paper became more substantive with every twist. The completed sculpture served as an ephemeral symbol of our collective commitment to progress. However, the sculpture is not intended as a permanent monument. In the same way “progress” today becomes history tomorrow, this work is about transformation and change.

 
How did you become interested in public artwork versus traditional gallery settings, and how does your practice benefit from this public outdoor exposure? 
I’m especially interested in the effects of human and environmental forces as a component of the installations development. For example, Propagate Progress was installed at Bergamot Station’s “People Park” where the community originally gathered (May 2016) to discuss our hopes, fears and promises. A variety of pigments, mark making techniques and conditions were applied by the participants who created results substantially different from what might have occurred in a controlled studio environment. The personal connection to the forming of the work allowed us the opportunity to know one another, connecting our personal challenges to global and local social/ environmental/ political problems.
Exposure to wind, sun and rain accelerated the sculptures destruction, rapidly shifting our vibrant promises for a better tomorrow into faded, decomposing pulp.

What do you think about the timeliness of the work in the state of the world today?
Notions of progress can be riddled with judgment based on differing points of view. For example, developers often view gentrification as “progress” because it will improve building standards and/or introduce new services while long-time residents of a gentrifying area may view it as “regress” because it would change or eliminate the culture of their neighborhood.
 When I first engaged the community in May 2016 we were in the primary stages of the presidential election process. By the time the work was installed on December 15th, many Americans were frightened of the changes that were promised (threatened) under the guise of progress. Today, the installation is gone, but more than ever before our challenges remain.
 Much of my artwork wrestles with what progress means, including changes in our environment, as well as changes in equality for women, LGBTQs and people of color. I try to affect my own vision for progress through making and exhibiting artwork about these issues.


Renae Barnard’s work is layered with meaning and consciousness that allows everyone to engage on their own unique level. She is making political work that is powerful and strong without hitting you over the head with it, rather you get to let it sink in as you spend time with her and the work she is making. Her poetic gestures within her practice symbolize a larger community and struggle that is both singular and shared. You can find more of Renae’s work here:

By: Megan St. Clair
3/7/17

Les Femmes Folles: The Women, 2014


Happy Women’s History Month! Available March 1 on Blurb.com:

Les Femmes Folles: The Women, 2014, is the fourth annual anthology including art, interview excerpts, poetry and short-form writing by women in all forms, levels and styles of art from around the world. Cover art by Christine Stoddard.

Writes author Cat Dixon (catdix.com): "Again Les Femmes Folles (now in its fourth year) delivers powerful poetry and inspiring art from some of the finest women producing creative work. From Laura Carlson's studio shot that begins the book to Susan Bee's bright collage and oil on canvas to Selima Dawson's powerful black, gray and red painting to the raw poetry of Andrea Potos…every page vibrates with intensity and vulnerability. Make no mistake: these women are proud, strong and fierce. The end of the book features a quote from beloved artist Wanda Ewing that says "You be you." Here each artist is herself and the book embraces the individual styles of the artists and writers. When these different artists are combined in one collection, the result is passionate and memorable."

Writes poet Sara Henning (sarahenning.net): "In Les Femmes Folles: The Women, 2014, expect to encounter a literary feast of feminism, a cornucopia of works and interviews from female artists and writers, a soirée of the divine feminine spirit that has always surged from patriarchy’s confining thumb-hold. Here, the fourth annual edition continues a lineage of female empowerment vetted in the previous editions, drawing on the sage guidance that women have shared with each other, words that have kept us alive. ‘Resist that anxious feeling that time is running out,’ Stephanie Kadel Taras tells us in one interview, ‘your artistic life lasts your whole life.’ Or as Ayn Frances dela Cruz tells us, ‘If art does things to you, makes you see and feel things, makes your heart beat you know, if you live it and breathe it, then maybe you could have a fuller, happier life in pursuing it.’"

Contributors include: Linda Adato, Beatriz Albuquerque, Renae Barnard, Sharon Louise Barnes, Susan Bee, Sandra Bouguerch, Tracy Brown, Jessica Burke, Laura Carlson, Amy Cerra, Olivia Ciummo, Tusia Dabrowska, Andrea Davis, Selima Dawson, Ayn Frances dela Cruz, Aster V. Delgado, Karen Fitzgerald, Sheila Grabarsky, Zoe Hawk, Megan Hildebrandt, Cindy Hinant, Breanne Holden, Patricia Izzo, Nugent Kos, Alinta Krauth, Melissa Ann Lambert, Erin Leland, Robin Little, Amelia Marzec, Rachel Mindrup, Mother Art Collective, Ellen Mueller, Christie Neptune, Christy Nicholas, Jane Odartey, Cathleen Parra, Stacey Piwinski, Joyce Polance, Caroline Record, Cindy Rehm, Martha Rial, Lauren Rinaldi, Elizabeth Ross, Marisol Salanova, Asia Scudder, Evelin Stermitz, Christine Stoddard, Simone Stoll, Brenda Stumpf, Bonnie MacAllister, Katrin Talbot, Cendres Lavy, Isabel Perez del Pulgar, Susana Amundaraín, Marlana Adele Vassar, Amy Gigi Alexander, Liz Axelrod, Tanaz Bhathena, Susana H. Case, Sarah A. Chavez, Carol Ciavonne, Kirsten Clodfelter, SuzAnne C. Cole, Julie Schwietert Collazo, Sally Cooper, Kate Falvey, Jamie Feldman, Sherese Francis, Sara Henning, Fran Higgins, Patrina Jones, Stephanie Kadel Taras, Kelli Stevens Kane, Sandra Gail Lambert, M. Mack, Mariana McDonald, L.Nahay, Andrea Potos, Nicole Provencher-Natale, Vanessa Raney, Gabrielle Selz, Emma Jo Stankiewicz, Donna Steiner, Jennifer MacBain Stephens, Judith Gold Stitzel, Nicole Tong, Joanna Valente, Deb Vanasse, Saira Viola, Amy Schriebman Walter, Phyllis Wax, Patricia Wellingham-Jones, Allison Wilkins, Laura Madeline Wiseman, Sara Landas and Holli Rae, Muriel Louveau, Mary Carrick and Maia Kumari Gilman.



Les Femmes Folles is a volunteer organization founded in 2011 with the mission to support and promote women in all forms, styles and levels of art from around the world with the online journal, print annuals, exhibitions and events; originally inspired by artist Wanda Ewing and her curated exhibit by the name Les Femmes Folles (Wild Women). LFF Books is a micro-feminist press that publishes 1-2 books per year by the creators of Les Femmes Folles including Intimates & Fools (Laura Madeline Wiseman, 2014) and The Hunger of the Cheeky Sisters: Ten Tales (Laura Madeline Wiseman/Lauren Rinaldi, 2015). Other titles include Les Femmes Folles: The Women 2011, 2012 and 2013, available on blurb.com, including art, poetry and interview excerpts from women artists. A portion of the proceeds from LFF books and products benefit the University of Nebraska-Omaha’s Wanda Ewing Scholarship Fund.



Femmesfollesnebraska.tumblr.com; Facebook.com/femmesfolles; Twitter.com/lffsallydeskins Lesfemmesfollesbooks.tumblr.com; Facebook.com/bookslesfemmesfolles; Twitter.com/lffbooks

Homemakers: An Art Exhibition Featuring 25 Women Artists in an Underground Tunnel

25 Women Artists Take Over a Los Angeles Underground Tunnel with

HOME MAKERS?

Exhibition

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Free art exhibit to take place for one night only on July 12 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Presenting more than 75 works by 25 female artists,

HOME MAKERS?

is the first Los Angeles exhibition to highlight women makers in a setting free from the hierarchies that segregate fine arts and craft. Curated by Renae Barnard, this exhibition connects women artists from diverse communities directly with visitors for one night only,

Saturday July 12, 2014from 6:00pm-10:00pm

Operating outside the traditional art market, the exhibition will take place in an underground tunnel

in East Los Angeles and provide 100% of sales directly to the participating artists. The tunnel walls will feature photography by Leila May, Maria Garcia-Clark and Cathleen Parra, paintings by Alice Maldonado, Elwing Gonzales, and Nicole Reyes, illustrations by Cheryl Angel and Olivia Healy-Mirkovich, and sculptural fiber works by Renae Barnard, Fang Li, Jacqueline Meyers-Cho, Kin Chen and Vanessa Fry.

The above ground intersection will be temporarily closed to traffic allowing for installation artists Diana Madriaga, Debbie Carlson, Jaklin Romine and Olga Lah to literally take over the street. Ceramicists Sharon Hardy and Sarah Hagen will be hosting vignettes of their work above ground alongside fiber artist Cara Mullinary, Julie Roth and Julie Kornblum and sculptors/ jewelry designer Robin Little. Master of Ceremonies Rebekah Waites will be spinning tunes all evening and introducing a special performance by Jessica Ceballos at 7:30pm.

View the event gallery with captions at

http://renaebarnard.com/portfolio/public-art/home-makers/1